Shinzō Abe

Reconciliation Address at Pearl Harbor

delivered 27 December 2016, Oahu, Hawaii

English Language Audio AR-XE mp3 of Address [w/ Interpreter]

Plug-in required for flash audio

 

  Prime Minister Abe: [as interpreted]: President Obama, Commander Harris, ladies and gentlemen, and all American citizens:  I stand here at Pearl Harbor as the Prime Minister of Japan. 

If we listen closely, we can make out the sound of restless waves breaking and then retreating again.  The calm inlet of brilliant blue is radiant with the gentle sparkle of the warm sun.  Behind me, a striking white form atop the azure, is the  USS Arizona Memorial.

Together, with President Obama, I paid a visit to that memorial, the resting place for many souls.  It’s a place which brought utter silence to me.  Inscribed there are the names of the servicemen who lost their lives.  Sailors and Marines hailing from California, New York, Michigan, Texas, and various other places, serving to uphold their noble duty of protecting the homeland they loved, lost their lives amidst searing flames that day, when aerial bombing tore the USS Arizona in two.

Even 75 years later, the USS Arizona, now at rest atop the seabed, is the final resting place for a tremendous number of sailors and Marines.  Listening again as I focus my senses, alongside the song of the breeze and the rumble of the rolling waves, I can almost discern the voices of those crewmen:

Voices of lively conversation, upbeat and at ease, on that day, on a Sunday morning;

Voices of young servicemen talking to each other about their future and dreams;

Voices calling out names of loved ones in their very final moments;

Voices praying for the happiness of children still unborn.

And every one of those servicemen had a mother and a father anxious about his safety.  Many had wives and girlfriends they loved, and many must have had children they would have loved watch grow up.  All of that was brought to an end.  When I contemplate that solemn reality I am rendered entirely speechless. 

“Rest in peace, precious souls of the fallen.”  With that overwhelming sentiment, I cast flowers, on behalf of Japanese people, upon the waters where those sailors and Marines sleep.

President Obama, the people of the United States of America, and the people around the world, as the Prime Minister of Japan, I offer my sincere and everlasting condolences to the souls of those who lost their lives here, as well as to the spirits of all the brave men and women whose lives were taken by a war that commenced in this very place, and also to the souls of the countless innocent people who became the victims of the war.

We must never repeat the horrors of war again.  This is the solemn vow we, the people of Japan, have taken.  Since the war, we have created a free and democratic country that values the rule of law, and has resolutely upheld our vow never again to wage war.  We, the people of Japan, will continue to uphold this unwavering principle while harboring quiet pride in the path we have walked as a peace-loving nation over these 70 years since the war ended.

To the souls of the servicemen who lie in eternal rest aboard the USS Arizona, to the American people, and to all peoples around the world, I pledge that unwavering vow here as the Prime Minister of Japan.

Yesterday, at the Marine Corps Base Hawaii in Kaneohe Bay, I visited the memorial marker for an Imperial Japanese Navy officer.  He was a fighter pilot by the name of Commander Fusata Iida, who was hit during the attack on Pearl Harbor, and gave up on returning to his aircraft carrier.  He went back instead, and died.  It was not Japanese who erected a marker at the site that Iida’s fighter plane crashed; it was U.S. servicemen who had been on the receiving end of his attack.  Applauding the bravery of the dead pilot, they erected this stone marker.

On the marker, his rank at that time is inscribed:  Lieutenant, Imperial Japanese Navy -- showing the respect to a serviceman who gave his life for his country.  “The brave respect the brave.”  So wrote Ambrose Bierce in a famous poem.  Showing respect even to an enemy they fought against, trying to understand even an enemy that they hated.  Therein lies the spirit of tolerance embraced by the American people.

When the war ended, and Japan was a nation in burnt-out ruins as far as the eye could see, suffering under abject poverty, it was the United States and its good people that unstintingly sent us food to eat and clothes to wear.  The Japanese people managed to survive and make their way toward the future, thanks to the sweaters and milk sent by the American people.  And it was the United States that opened up the path for Japan to return to the international community once more after the war.

Under the leadership of the United States, Japan, as a member of the free world, was able to enjoy peace and prosperity.  The goodwill and assistance you extended to us Japanese -- the enemy you had fought so furiously -- together with the tremendous spirit of tolerance, were etched deeply into the hearts and minds of our grandfathers and mothers.  We also remember them.  Our children and grandchildren will also continue to pass these memories down and never forget what you did for us.

The words pass through my mind -- those words described on the wall at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., where I visited with President Obama:  “With malice toward none, with charity for all, let us strive on to do all which may achieve and cherish a lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.”  These are the words of Abraham Lincoln.

On behalf of the Japanese people, I hereby wish to express once again my heartfelt gratitude to the United States and to the world for the tolerance extended to Japan. 

It has now been 75 years since that Pearl Harbor.  Japan and the United States, which fought a fierce war that will go down in the annals of human history, have become allies, with deep and strong ties rarely found anywhere in history.  We are allies that will tackle together to an even greater degree than ever before the many challenges covering the globe.  Ours is an alliance of hope that will lead us to the future.

What has binded us together is the hope of reconciliation made possible through the spirit, the tolerance.  What I want to appeal to the people of the world here at Pearl Harbor, together with President Obama, is this power of reconciliation.  Even today, the horrors of war have not been eradicated from the surface of the world.  There is no end to the spiral where hatred creates hatred.  The world needs the spirit of tolerance and the power of reconciliation now, and especially now.

Japan and the United States, which have eradicated hatred and cultivated friendship and trust on the basis of common values, are now -- and especially now -- taking responsibility for appealing to the world about the importance of tolerance and the power of reconciliation.  That is precisely why the Japan-U.S. alliance is an alliance of hope.

The inlet gazing at us is tranquil as far as the eye can see.  Pearl Harbor.  It is precisely this inlet, flowing like shimmering pearls, that is a symbol of tolerance and reconciliation.  It is my wish that our Japanese children and -- President Obama, your American children, and, indeed, their children and grandchildren -- and people all around the world will continue to remember Pearl Harbor as a symbol of reconciliation.

We will spare no efforts to continue our endeavors to make that wish a reality.

Together with President Obama, I hereby make my steadfast pledge.

Thank you very much.

 

 

[President Barack Obama: Pearl Harbor Reconciliation Address]


Japanese Language Audio AR-XE mp3 of Address

 

【安倍総理発言】
 オバマ大統領、ハリス司令官、御列席の皆様、そして、全ての、アメリカ国民の皆様。
 パールハーバー、真珠湾に、今、私は、日本国総理大臣として立っています。
 耳を澄ますと、寄せては返す、波の音が聞こえてきます。降り注ぐ陽の、やわらかな光に照らされた、青い、静かな入り江。
 私の後ろ、海の上の、白い、アリゾナ・メモリアル。
 あの、慰霊の場を、オバマ大統領と共に訪れました。
 そこは、私に、沈黙をうながす場所でした。
 亡くなった、軍人たちの名が、記されています。
 祖国を守る崇高な任務のため、カリフォルニア、ミシガン、ニューヨーク、テキサス、様々な地から来て、乗り組んでいた兵士たちが、あの日、爆撃が戦艦アリゾナを二つに切り裂いたとき、紅蓮(ぐれん)の炎の中で、死んでいった。
 75年が経った今も、海底に横たわるアリゾナには、数知れぬ兵士たちが眠っています。
 耳を澄まして心を研ぎ澄ますと、風と、波の音とともに、兵士たちの声が聞こえてきます。
 あの日、日曜の朝の、明るく寛(くつろ)いだ、弾む会話の声。
 自分の未来を、そして夢を語り合う、若い兵士たちの声。
 最後の瞬間、愛する人の名を叫ぶ声。
 生まれてくる子の、幸せを祈る声。
 一人ひとりの兵士に、その身を案じる母がいて、父がいた。愛する妻や、恋人がいた。成長を楽しみにしている、子供たちがいたでしょう。
 それら、全ての思いが断たれてしまった。
 その厳粛な事実を思うとき、かみしめるとき、私は、言葉を失います。
 その御霊(みたま)よ、安らかなれ――。思いを込め、私は日本国民を代表して、兵士たちが眠る海に、花を投じました。
 オバマ大統領、アメリカ国民の皆さん、世界の、様々な国の皆さん。
 私は日本国総理大臣として、この地で命を落とした人々の御霊に、ここから始まった戦いが奪った、全ての勇者たちの命に、戦争の犠牲となった、数知れぬ、無辜(むこ)の民の魂に、永劫の、哀悼の誠を捧げます。
 戦争の惨禍は、二度と、繰り返してはならない。
 私たちは、そう誓いました。そして戦後、自由で民主的な国を創り上げ、法の支配を重んじ、ひたすら、不戦の誓いを貫いてまいりました。
 戦後70年間に及ぶ平和国家としての歩みに、私たち日本人は、静かな誇りを感じながら、この不動の方針を、これからも貫いてまいります。
 この場で、戦艦アリゾナに眠る兵士たちに、アメリカ国民の皆様に、世界の人々に、固い、その決意を、日本国総理大臣として、表明いたします。
 昨日、私は、カネオヘの海兵隊基地に、一人の日本帝国海軍士官の碑(いしぶみ)を訪れました。
 その人物とは、真珠湾攻撃中に被弾し、母艦に帰るのを諦め、引き返し、戦死した、戦闘機パイロット、飯田房太中佐です。
 彼の墜落地点に碑を建てたのは、日本人ではありません。攻撃を受けていた側にいた、米軍の人々です。死者の、勇気を称え、石碑を建ててくれた。
 碑には、祖国のため命を捧げた軍人への敬意を込め、日本帝国海軍大尉(だいい)と、当時の階級を刻んであります。
 The brave respect the brave.
 勇者は、勇者を敬う。
 アンブローズ・ビアスの、詩(うた)は言います。
 戦い合った敵であっても、敬意を表する。憎しみ合った敵であっても、理解しようとする。
 そこにあるのは、アメリカ国民の、寛容の心です。
 戦争が終わり、日本が、見渡す限りの焼け野原、貧しさのどん底の中で苦しんでいたとき、食べるもの、着るものを惜しみなく送ってくれたのは、米国であり、アメリカ国民でありました。
 皆さんが送ってくれたセーターで、ミルクで、日本人は、未来へと、命をつなぐことができました。
 そして米国は、日本が、戦後再び、国際社会へと復帰する道を開いてくれた。米国のリーダーシップの下、自由世界の一員として、私たちは、平和と繁栄を享受することができました。
 敵として熾烈に戦った、私たち日本人に差し伸べられた、こうした皆さんの善意と支援の手、その大いなる寛容の心は、祖父たち、母たちの胸に深く刻まれています。
 私たちも、覚えています。子や、孫たちも語り継ぎ、決して忘れることはないでしょう。
 オバマ大統領と共に訪れた、ワシントンのリンカーン・メモリアル。その壁に刻まれた言葉が、私の心に去来します。
 誰に対しても、悪意を抱かず、慈悲の心で向き合う。
 永続する平和を、我々全ての間に打ち立て、大切に守る任務を、やり遂げる。
 エイブラハム・リンカーン大統領の、言葉です。
 私は日本国民を代表し、米国が、世界が、日本に示してくれた寛容に、改めて、ここに、心からの感謝を申し上げます。
 あの「パールハーバー」から75年。歴史に残る激しい戦争を戦った日本と米国は、歴史にまれな、深く、強く結ばれた同盟国となりました。
 それは、いままでにもまして、世界を覆う幾多の困難に、共に立ち向かう同盟です。明日を拓く、「希望の同盟」です。
 私たちを結びつけたものは、寛容の心がもたらした、the power of reconciliation、「和解の力」です。
 私が、ここパールハーバーで、オバマ大統領とともに、世界の人々に対して訴えたいもの。それは、この、和解の力です。
 戦争の惨禍は、いまだ世界から消えない。憎悪が憎悪を招く連鎖は、なくなろうとしない。
 寛容の心、和解の力を、世界は今、今こそ、必要としています。
 憎悪を消し去り、共通の価値の下、友情と、信頼を育てた日米は、今、今こそ、寛容の大切さと、和解の力を、世界に向かって訴え続けていく、任務を帯びています。
 日本と米国の同盟は、だからこそ「希望の同盟」なのです。
 私たちを見守ってくれている入り江は、どこまでも静かです。
 パールハーバー。
 真珠の輝きに満ちた、この美しい入り江こそ、寛容と、そして和解の象徴である。
 私たち日本人の子供たち、そしてオバマ大統領、皆さんアメリカ人の子供たちが、またその子供たち、孫たちが、そして世界中の人々が、パールハーバーを和解の象徴として記憶し続けてくれることを私は願います。 そのための努力を、私たちはこれからも、惜しみなく続けていく。オバマ大統領とともに、ここに、固く、誓います。
 ありがとうございました。


Book/CDs by Michael E. Eidenmuller, Published by McGraw-Hill (2008)

Also in this database: President Barack Obama's Pearl Harbor Reconciliation Address

English Text and Audio Source: WhiteHouse.gov

Japanese Text and Audio Source: Official Website of the Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet

Image Source: Official Website of the Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet

Audio Note: AR-XE = American Rhetoric Extreme Enhancement

U.S. Copyright Status: English Text and Audio = Public domain. Japanese Text, Audio, Image = Used in accordance with the terms found here. Image of Flag of Japan = Public domain.

Top 100 American Speeches

Online Speech Bank

Movie Speeches

© Copyright 2001-Present. 
American Rhetoric.